Welcome to our Jalisco condo blog!

The purpose of the “Jalisco Condo Manual” and the “Jalisco Condo Law in English” was to fill a knowledge gap about the condo law in Jalisco. The goal is to help condos run more smoothly, and to follow the condo law.

This blog is a way for us to give you updates and corrections to these books, to expand or clarify popular topics about condos, and to raise and talk about new topics that aren't covered in the books.

As always, this isn't legal advice. If an issue is important, I recommend you consult a Mexican legal professional. See our "Disclaimer" for more detail.

We encourage you to comment on blog topics! Please ask questions, and share your own experiences. All comments are reviewed. See our "Comment Policies" for more detail.

We also welcome comments and suggestions that don't relate to a specific post. Use the "Email Us" tab at the left to send us an email with your questions or comments.

I hope you'll find the books, the extra information on this blog, and the interactive comments helpful.

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How to Satisfy the Legal Requirement of a Minute Book for Board Minutes

Why do you need to keep board minutes? Your condo is required by Article 1012 of the Civil Code to keep minutes of every council (board) meeting, along with their attachments. These minutes are an important part of your condo’s records that: are a permanent and legal record of the proceedings of each board meeting;Read more…

Is a Condo Responsible For Property Tax Bills?

An issue has come up recently that’s produced a flurry of questions from my readers. This topic seems to have created more interest than any other. So… a blog post seems in order. Disclaimer I have no first-hand knowledge of this situation. Everything I know about what the municipalities are allegedly doing is second andRead more…

Dealing With Employees & Independent Contractors

A condo often needs to hire people such as an Administrator, accountant, people to look after the common property (like gardeners or a pool maintenance contractor), and even security guards. There are two different ways a condo can hire someone to do work, and it’s important to clearly understand the differences: employee; or independent contractorRead more…

The Jalisco Condo Law Before 1995 – REVISED

In the “Jalisco Condo Manual,” I say that that the book is based on the condo legislation passed in 1995, and that different rules applied before then. So what’s the situation for condos that were set up before 1995? This is a re-write of a recent article This is a re-write of the article IRead more…

What Can Jalisco Learn From Quintana Roo?

A unique section of the condo law This is a short post about a unique piece of condo legislation from another state in Mexico that I think can serve as a model for Jalisco and all other states. Quintana Roo, like many states, has a separate condo law outside of its Civil Code (Jalisco’s isRead more…

How to Handle a Blind-Side at an Assembly

There are some issues that are complex enough that you want to make sure they pass an assembly vote without needing changes at the assembly. These issues are just too complex to deal with at an assembly. Complex wording shouldn’t be thrashed out at an assembly For example, let’s say you need to change yourRead more…

Cutting-Off Water to a Delinquent Owner

Any condo that has delinquent owners is frustrated by this state of affairs, and is always looking for any pressure they can apply to get these people to pay. Rather than a municipal water supply, some condos have their own water supply (often in the form of a well). They don’t actually own this waterRead more…

Your Condo’s Fiscal Year

In my book, the “Jalisco Condo Manual,” I say that a condo’s fiscal year should run from April 1 to March 31. I get a lot of questions like, “Where does it say this in the condo law?” It’s Implicit Rather Than Explicit Those of you who’ve asked this are right! There’s nothing in theRead more…

How Condo Boards Can Deal With Difficult People

Human nature is the problem A condominium is a unique way of owning property because it forces you to work with other owners to make decisions affecting the common property. Human nature being what it is, this inevitably means conflict. Potential for disagreement exists as soon as you have more than one person involved inRead more…

What’s Legal and What’s Not?

Most of the questions I get from book owners start out, “Is it legal to…?”. Sometimes there’s a clear answer, because the condo law covers the issue explicitly. However, sometimes this isn’t the case. What then? Basic legal principle There’s a basic concept in civil law (the type of legal system used in Mexico) thatRead more…

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